This blog is about Hawaii's status as an independent country under prolonged illegal occupation by the United States, and the history, culture, law & politics of the islands.

By Scott Crawford, Hana, Maui

Archive

Old Archives (Aug03-Oct09)

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Hawaii Blogs

‘Onipa‘a Celebration

Traveling in the Footsteps of a Queen

Sovereignty Restoration Day marked with kalo-pounding event

The Maui News reports on activities for La Ho’iho’i Ea on Maui.

La Ho’iho’i Ea in Kahului

La Ho’iho’i Ea in Honolulu

La Ho’iho’i Ea Educational Seminar in Hilo

NEA recognizes Hawaiian overthrow/occupation

From the HawaiianKingdom.org Blog:

At its Annual Meeting and Representative Assembly on July 4, the National Education Association (NEA), of which the Hawaii State Teachers Association (HSTA) is a part, agreed to the following:

“The NEA will publish an article that documents the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian Monarchy in 1893, the prolonged occupation of the United States in the Hawaiian Kingdom and the harmful effects that this occupation has had on the Hawaiian people and resources of the land.”

According to the HSTA Facebook, Chris Santomauro, a teacher at Kane‘ohe Elementary introduced the proposal, and Uluhani Wai‘ale‘ale, a teacher at Kualapu‘u Charter School on Moloka‘i gave an impassioned and articulate argument in favor of the proposal and it swayed a majority of teachers from across the United States to support it.

La Ho’iho’i Ea in Wai’anae

Theft of a Nation – July 4 Reenactment

From Press Release:

Beginning at 10:00 am July 4, 2017, on the front steps of ʻIolani Palace in Honolulu, La Hoʻihoʻi Ea will present a dramatic re-enactment of the events that led to proclaiming into existence of the Republic of Hawaii and the subsequent installation of Sanford B. Dole as President of the Territory of Hawaii. “With Bible in hand, pistols in their pockets and American Naval troops at the ready, men gathered on the steps of ʻIolani Palace on July 4th, 1894. Invoking the name of American liberty, they dismantled the liberty of the people of the Hawaiian Kingdom.”
This exciting re-enactment is free and open to the public.

 

 

Iolani Palace vandalism

Debby Fawcett has a column in Honolulu Civil Beat about the problems with vandalism at ‘Iolani Palace and homelessness on the Palace grounds.